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Kawasaki gearboxes - what's happening!


Obadiah Blank

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When I kick any of the Kawasakis I've ridden into first gear, there is an almighty clunk, like the gearbox is exploding.  It's always like this, doesn't get any better, or worse, no matter the miles.  Usually worse when cold.

What is going on inside?

Does it have to be like that?

Is it the thick clutch oil 'dragging' one of the gear spindles around? 

I've ridden loads of different makes of bikes, all bike gearboxes clunk, but not like a Kawasakis. 

I think this is the best place for this question, sorry if it's not.  It's something that's always puzzled me.

 

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2 hours ago, hawkati said:

They all do that sir....

 

You get used to it when you've ridden Kawasakis for years...... it's when you then jump on another make of bike and it doesn't do it that worries you....... is it actually in gear ?

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Mine does it, but so does my big Suzuki’s. Can’t remember the last time I had a bike that went nicely into gear without a KEEER-LUUUNK.  Over the years I’ve had different plates, springs, oil, chain tensions etc etc.  Still the same. 

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clutch gets a bit sticky when it's cold. I used to put the bike in gear with engine off and clutch in and push it backwards to break the stiction in the plates before starting the engine

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This is the best answer I've got from elsewhere (thanks almost_les).  It makes sense, but if others can make their boxes quiet and strong...

Leave your bike off and put it in gear. Push it forward, then push it back. You'll notice a lot of drive train slop because the transmission uses dog-type engagement. That "clunk" is all of that slop being taken up.

The gap between the dogs is larger than the dogs to allow a lager "window" for all the spinning parts to be lined up enough to let the gears slide into position. The neutral spinning gears slide over into first when the dogs slip into the window, and since they still have momentum, they make that clunk noise when they meet the dogs that they are to engage with.

image.png.92d8813b79053d44cfcb80cbd44b6eb6.pngimage.png.ed4eadcf6665cad61dee3395a52500ea.png

 
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1 hour ago, Obadiah Blank said:

This is the best answer I've got from elsewhere (thanks almost_les).  It makes sense, but if others can make their boxes quiet and strong...

Leave your bike off and put it in gear. Push it forward, then push it back. You'll notice a lot of drive train slop because the transmission uses dog-type engagement. That "clunk" is all of that slop being taken up.

The gap between the dogs is larger than the dogs to allow a lager "window" for all the spinning parts to be lined up enough to let the gears slide into position. The neutral spinning gears slide over into first when the dogs slip into the window, and since they still have momentum, they make that clunk noise when they meet the dogs that they are to engage with.

image.png.92d8813b79053d44cfcb80cbd44b6eb6.pngimage.png.ed4eadcf6665cad61dee3395a52500ea.png

 

Same as every other bike this side of motogp.

Bigger bikes have bigger gears with more inertia so do tend to "clunk" more.

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